The 11 Best Museums in Brooklyn: Where to Go to Know Something New

8:15 am  |  23.07.2021

Are you looking for the best museum in Brooklyn? Then you have come to the right place – because we show you not only the most important museums in Brooklyn but also exhibitions, exhibitions, and galleries that are in this borough of New York. There are many good museums to choose from in Brooklyn.

Brooklyn Children’s Museum


Museum in Dumbo

Founded in 1899, the Brooklyn Children’s Museum is the premier museum for children. “Together in the City” is dedicated to life, work, and play in a city like New York. The pizzeria, where the children bake pizza, serve it to their friends, and are also responsible for the till is one of the favorite attractions.

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Brooklyn Historical Society Museum

Museum in Dumbo

Founded in 1863 and recently renovated, this British architectural style exhibition enchants visitors every day. The well-stocked library, interesting photographs, very old landscape maps, old newspapers, and excerpts from family stories give you a very good overview of past events in Brooklyn.

Brooklyn Museum

Museum in Park Slope

The Brooklyn Museum is the answer to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan. In Brooklyn, the building, designed by McKim and Mead & White in 1897, houses the seventh-largest art collection in the United States with more than 2 million objects. Particular highlights are the Egyptian and pre-Columbian collections.

C.V. Starr Bonsai Museum

Museum in Park Slope

The extensive bonsai collection is located in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and is one of the most beautiful in the world. The collection includes around 350 trees. Here you can find out everything you need to know about the history of bonsai trees, their culture, and care.

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Jewish Children’s Museum

Museum in Dumbo


The Jewish Children’s Museum, a place of learning and discovery, is a unique facility where parents and children of all traditions can explore Jewish history and heritage in an engaging, interactive environment.

Museum of Food and Drink

Museum in Williamsburg

The Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD) presented its first public exhibition in 2013, launched through Kickstarter. The campaign raised more than $ 100,000, the highest sum ever raised by a museum. The Museum of Food and Drink tells the story of the different cuisines around the world. You experience all facets and are encouraged to smell, touch and taste. Located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the museum is great for food lovers.

Museum of Pizza

Museum in Williamsburg

The Museum of Pizza is exactly what it sounds like. It’s also the only art experience in the world dedicated to the iconic pizza cake. The museum is aimed at the “next generation of learners” and was launched by a youth media group called “Nameless Network”. The Museum of Pizza is located in the William Vale hotel.

New York Transit Museum

Museum in Dumbo

The focus of the museum is on the development of the 100-year-old subway, bus, and trolley system. A special highlight is hidden in the basement – there is a true-to-original subway platform with vintage subway cars.

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The Coney Island Museum

Museum in Coney Island & Brighton Beach

Curious about the history of the Coney Islands? Here you will find the answers and there are different events taking place.

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Waterfront Museum and Showboat Barge

Museum in Red Hook


If you want to learn more about the history of Red Hook, then don’t miss the Waterfront Museum and Showboat Barge. As you plan, keep in mind that the museum is only open on Thursdays and Saturdays.

Weeksville Heritage Center

Museum in Dumbo

African American history comes to life at the Weeksville Heritage Center! The historic Hunterfly Road Homes are the only remaining homes in Weeksville – a dynamic, self-contained 19th century African American community.

The Creative Heart of Brooklyn

Many well-known US writers, songwriters have settled in Brooklyn Heights and Dumbo. Most of them affectionately refer to the area as their creative bubble. The serenity of the area and the impressive tranquility – so close to Manhattan – has been the reason why history has often been written here for many years. For example by Truman Capote, who wrote “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” at 70 Willow Street.

During your exploration tour, take a walk through streets such as the Cranberry, the Hicks, the Willo, or the Pierremont Street and discover the area there from its most beautiful side.

The abbreviation Dumbo stands for “Down under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass” and describes an area that could not have changed faster. It wasn’t too long ago that mainly factory buildings stood here – one of the most famous is the so-called Eskimo Pie Building on 100 Bridge Street. Built-in 1908 and 1908, it served as the headquarters of the Thomson Meter Company for many years. Old factory buildings like this are what make Dumbo so special.

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Artists moved here in the seventies and eighties and vacant complexes were transformed into great, spacious lofts with breathtaking views of the Manhattan skyline. Dumbo has lots of creative shops, local artists, great restaurants, and cute cafes.

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